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Dawn Fitzgerald captured a photo of this buck sitting in her backyard on Oct. 27 in Rapid City.


THE BUZZ

LONDON | Actor Liam Neeson says the Hollywood sexual harassment scandal has sparked "a bit of a witch hunt."

Asked about the issue on the Irish broadcaster RTE, Neeson said: "There's some people, famous people, being suddenly accused of touching some girl's knee or something and suddenly they're being dropped from their program."

He referred to U.S. radio presenter and writer Garrison Keillor, who was dropped by Minnesota Public Radio last year over an allegation of "inappropriate behavior." Neeson said that wasn't the same as the "other Harvey Weinstein stuff." Neeson also said he was "on the fence" regarding sexual misconduct allegations against Dustin Hoffman.

But the 65-year-old "Taken" star also said in Friday's Late Late Show that the "#MeToo" movement taking place "across every industry (is) healthy."

Wahlberg donates $1.5M film fee

NEW YORK | Following an outcry over a significant disparity in pay between co-stars, Mark Wahlberg agreed Saturday to donate the $1.5 million he earned for reshoots for "All the Money in the World" to the sexual misconduct defense initiative Time's Up.

Wahlberg said he'll donate the money in the name of his co-star, Michelle Williams, who reportedly made less than $1,000 on the reshoots.

"I 100% support the fight for fair pay," Wahlberg said in a statement.

The announcement Saturday came after directors and stars, including Jessica Chastain and Judd Apatow, shared their shock at reports of the huge pay disparity for the Ridley Scott film. The 10 days of reshoots were necessary after Kevin Spacey was replaced by Christopher Plummer when accusations of sexual misconduct surfaced against Spacey. USA Today reported Williams was paid less than $1,000 for the 10 days.

Both Williams and Plummer were nominated for Golden Globes for their performances.

Talent agency William Morris Endeavor, which represents both Williams and Wahlberg, said it will donate an additional $500,000 to Time's Up. The agency said in a statement that wage disparity conversations should continue and "we are committed to being part of the solution."

Williams had no immediate comment Saturday, according to publicist Mara Buxbaum.


Local
Two Cents comments for Jan. 14

Why are houses now allowed to be built in the area of East St. Patrick Street and E. Highway 44? Has the flood of 1972 been forgotten or have they moved Rapid Creek?

Substitute teachers in Rapid City now make less money than Walmart employees and they are entrusted with the huge responsibility of your children for as little as $10 an hour. No wonder the district has trouble finding enough to fill the need.

Rapid City bought the college building for office space (mistake because they used another location), but it would be a second mistake if they use it for the homeless. Downtown businesses (Main Street Square), tourists viewing statues, and School of Mines projects will be hurt if you dump the homeless population on top of them.

Mr. Ferebee paid the fine he was billed. He has every right to take whoever to court if he feels he was right and they were wrong and if the county thinks it was such a big deal then they can just pay the bill.

Why don't we get more immigrants from Norway? Norway has half the crime, universal health care, at least 27 days vacation, no gas or coal used for electricity generation, nine students per teacher and a budget surplus.


News
01 14 history

ON JAN. 14, 1968, the Green Bay Packers of the NFL defeated the AFL's Oakland Raiders, 33-14, in the second AFL-NFL World Championship game (now referred to as Super Bowl II).

In 1784, the United States ratified the Treaty of Paris ending the Revolutionary War; Britain followed suit in April 1784.

In 1927, the Paramount silent romantic comedy "It," starring Clara Bow (who became known as "The 'It' Girl"), had its world premiere in Los Angeles.

In 1943, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and French General Charles de Gaulle opened a wartime conference in Casablanca.

In 1963, Sylvia Plath's novel "The Bell Jar" was published in London under a pseudonym less than a month before Plath committed suicide.

In 1967, the Sixties' "Summer of Love" unofficially began with a "Human Be-In" involving tens of thousands of young people at Golden Gate Park in San Francisco.

In 1969, 27 people aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise, off Hawaii, were killed when a rocket warhead exploded, setting off a fire and additional explosions.

In 1975, the House Internal Security Committee (formerly the House Un-American Activities Committee) was disbanded.

In 1989, President Ronald Reagan delivered his 331st and final weekly White House radio address, telling listeners, "Believe me, Saturdays will never seem the same. I'll miss you."

In 1993, TV talk show host David Letterman announced he was moving from NBC to CBS.