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Overstocked on fresh produce? You can pickle more than you think
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Overstocked on fresh produce? You can pickle more than you think

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Pickles

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While you were preparing for self-isolation for an indefinite period of time, you probably made some big grocery trips to stock up. But if you find yourself with more fresh produce than you and your family can eat, freezing isn’t the only option. For a little variety that will add a punch of briny flavor to staples like rice, quinoa, and couscous, try pickling some of that extra produce. Here are 4 great unexpected pickle recipes to get you started...no cucumbers required:

1) Pickled Green Beans (Dilly Beans) from The Daring Gourmet

Super crisp, a little salty, and packed with flavor, pickled green beans might be one of the best healthy snacks to crunch on during family movie nights. This recipe from The Daring Gourmet uses fresh dill for that classic dill pickle flavor, so it’s a good choice for kids with picky palates but it’s elevated enough for adults. Pack your beans in a wide mouth mason jar so they’re easy to pick at throughout the week.

Le Parfait Super Terrine 1L Wide Mouth Canning Jar available from Amazon

2) Pickled Avocados from Constantly Cooking

Pickled avocados make a surprisingly tasty addition to burrito bowls, sandwiches, and salads. They also solve the age old problem of the never-ripe avocado. If you have a handful of avocados that seem like they’ve been rock solid for months, throw them in with some pickling vinegar to make them into a tasty treat before they suddenly spoil. 

Mrs. Wages Pickling and Canning Vinegar available from Amazon

3) Pickled Blueberries from By the Pounds

This unusual treat is perfect for preserving quickly perishable berries. While your first instincts might be to freeze blueberries for smoothies or turn them into a jam, pickled blueberries will change the way you look at this fruit forever. This simple recipe from By the Pounds suggests a few uses for the berries including on a salad, as a cocktail garnish, or on a cheese tray. The combination of the sweet and briny flavors also pairs perfectly with goat cheese on crostini. Try these 8 ounce mason jars for easy storage.

Ball Canning Jars with Airtight Lids available from Amazon

4) Pickled Carrots by Minimalist Baker

If you bought enough carrots to cook soup every night for the next few months, change things up by pickling a couple jars. This quick pickle recipe from Minimalist Baker is slightly sweet, slightly tangy, super crunchy, and sure to be a hit with kids and adults.

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