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Tech Billionaire-Arrest

This Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018, photo released by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department shows tech billionaire and advocate of crime victims Henry T. Nicholas III, in Las Vegas. Las Vegas police officer Larry Hadfield says Nicholas was arrested Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018 at a Las Vegas Strip casino-resort on suspicion of trafficking heroin, cocaine, meth and ecstasy. cognizance. Nicholas co-founded Broadcom in the '90s and left the company in 2003. Recently, he has been bankrolling ballot measures in the U.S. that aim to guarantee certain rights to crime victims. (Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department via AP)

Tech billionaire and advocate of crime victims Henry T. Nicholas III is facing drug counts after being arrested along with a woman Tuesday at a Las Vegas Strip casino-resort.

Nicholas was arrested on suspicion of trafficking heroin, cocaine, meth and ecstasy, Las Vegas police officer Larry Hadfield said Thursday. He added police responded to the casino-resort following a report from security, which had found contraband in a room.

Nicholas contributed $2.091 million in support of the passage of Marsy's Law by South Dakota voters in 2016, and another $450,000 in support of amendments to the law made by South Dakota voters this year.

Nicholas' attorney, David Chesnoff, told The Associated Press his team is doing its own investigation and will "deal with the facts in court." Court records show Nicholas has been released on his own recognizance.

Nicholas co-founded high-tech chipmaker Broadcom Corp. in 1991 and resigned as president and CEO in 2003. In 2008, he was indicted on narcotics and securities fraud charges. The charges in the securities case were dismissed in 2009 and the narcotics case in 2010.

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Five states — California, Ohio, Illinois, North Dakota and South Dakota — have a Marsy's Law on their books. South Dakota altered its law earlier this year to help police and prosecutors cut down on unforeseen bureaucratic problems it created. Montana voters passed a Marsy's Law in 2016 that the state Supreme Court later overturned, citing flaws in how it was written.

They're named after Marsalee "Marsy" Nicholas, a California college student who was stalked and killed in 1983 by an ex-boyfriend. Her brother is Henry Nicholas.

In South Dakota, the original Marsy's Law amendment voters passed in 2016 guaranteed crime victims and their family members the right to privacy, protection from harassment or abuse and timely notice of trial, sentencing and post-judgment proceedings. 

The new changes require victims to opt in to many of their rights and specifically allow authorities to share information to help solve crimes.

The Marsy's Law national organization in a statement released Thursday said its cause is "far greater than any one person.

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