{{featured_button_text}}
020119-nws-vision002 (copy)

Rapid City Council a measure Monday night granting the Rapid City Collective Impact the full $5 million in Vision Funds it had originally requested for the purchase of two properties along the 100 and 200 blocks of Kansas City Street for its OneHeart campus. The nonprofit plans to redevelop the property into a campus that would house area social service organizations seeking to assist the city's homeless.

The development of a downtown homeless resource center is getting a boost of $1.1 million in Vision Fund money, the Rapid City Council decided Monday.

Members of council approved the measure by a vote of 8-2, with Amanda Scott and John Roberts opposing it.

Rapid City Collective Impact will now receive the full $5 million that it had originally requested for the purchase and redevelopment of two Kansas City Street properties as the OneHeart campus. The difference will be made up using some Vision funding that had originally been earmarked for the renovation of Floyd Fitzgerald Stadium.

Additionally, Black Hills Sports Inc. will now receive the full $5 million that it first sought for the renovations, $3.8 million of which will come from the city's Capital Improvement Fund.

Several residents spoke during the meeting's public comment portion advocating for the reallocation. Roger Tellinghuisen, a Black Hills Sports board member, said the money would pave the way for the installation of artificial turf that would allow it to host events other than baseball.

Councilman Steve Laurenti, who proposed the measure, said that future Vision Fund rounds should provide more money to a smaller group of projects. 

"We need to try to get that committee to choose less projects but fully fund the ones that they choose," Laurenti said.

The move did not sit well with all members of the council. Some said it was unfair to other Vision Fund applicants, and that capital improvement funds are better suited to infrastructure projects.

Subscribe to Breaking News

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

"I am very uncomfortable that not everybody who participated in the Vision Fund application process was invited to this dance," Scott said.

By approving the proposal, the council cleared the way for the city to take ownership of the Kansas City Street property and lease it back to Collective Impact. In this way, City Attorney Joel Landeen previously told the Journal, the city's investment is better protected.

Taxes on the property would not be collected as a result. The property generated $80,427 in property tax revenue last year, 19 percent of which went to the city.

The Vision and Capital Improvement funds will each still maintain a balance of about $1 million.

Subscribe to Breaking News

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.
0
0
0
0
0
You must be logged in to react.
Click any reaction to login.