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The European Union and Israel have held high-level talks for the first time in a decade. The Europeans are keen to press Israeli Prime Minister Yair Lapid on how to help bring about a two-state solution to Israel's conflict with the Palestinians. EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell says the EU wants "the resumption of a political process that can lead to a two-state solution and a comprehensive regional peace.” Lapid took part in Monday’s talks by videoconference.

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Ukrainian forces have broken through Moscow’s defenses in the strategic southern Kherson region. The Russian military acknowledged the move Monday, which delivers a sharp blow to one of the four areas in Ukraine that Russian President Vladimir Putin annexed last week. Kherson has been one of the toughest battlefields for the Ukrainians, with open terrain that exposes them to Russian artillery fire. The Russian military said its troops have shifted to “a pre-prepared defensive line and continue to inflict massive fire damage" on Kyiv's forces in the Kherson region. In Moscow, Russia’s lower house of parliament on Monday quickly rubber-stamped an endorsement of the treaties for four regions of Ukraine to join Russia.

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A trial starting this week in Washington, D.C., is the biggest test yet in the Justice Department’s efforts to hold accountable those responsible for the attack on the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. This trial is against extremist leader Stewart Rhodes, founder of the Oath Keepers group, and four associates. Prosecutors say they spent several weeks amassing weapons, organizing paramilitary training and readying armed teams outside Washington to stop Joe Biden from becoming president. The Oath Keepers, for their part, say prosecutors twisted their words and the defendants insist there was never any plan to attack the Capitol.

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Poland's foreign minister has signed an official note to Germany requesting some $1.3 trillion in reparations for the damage incurred by occupying Nazi Germans during World War II. Zbigniew Rau said Monday the note will be handed to Germany's Foreign Ministry. The signing comes on the eve of Rau's meeting in Warsaw with German Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock. Poland's fight-wing government insists that Poland is owed reparations for the extensive war damage, while Berlin says it has paid compensation to the affected countries, including Poland, and considers the matter closed. On Sept. 1, Poland's government presented an extensive report on the damages, estimating them at the figure of $1.3 trillion.

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A man charged with killing 22 older women in the Dallas area is set to go on trial again on Monday. Billy Chemirmir was sentenced to life without parole this year for capital murder in the death of 81-year-old Lu Thi Harris. Prosecutors are looking to secure a second life sentence against him in the death of 87-year-old Mary Brooks. Charges against Chermirmir stacked up after his arrest in 2018 as police across the Dallas area reexamined deaths of older people that had been considered natural. Investigators believe he posed as a handyman or forced his way into apartments at independent living communities.

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Doctors have a message for vaccine-weary Americans: Don't skip your flu shot this fall. And for the first time, seniors are urged to get a special extra-strength kind. There's no way to predict how bad this flu season will be. Australia just emerged from a nasty one. In the U.S., annual flu vaccinations are recommended starting with 6-month-olds. Because seniors don't respond as well, the U.S. now recommends they get one of three types made with higher doses or an immune-boosting ingredient. Meanwhile, the companies that make the two most widely used COVID-19 vaccines now are testing flu shots made with the same technology.

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U.S. futures moved slightly higher as markets open the month trying to shake off a miserable September marred by fears that the Federal Reserve’s aggressive interest rate hikes would hurtle the U.S. economy into a recession. Futures for the Dow Jones Industrials rose 0.8% early Monday and futures for the S&P 500 gained 0.7%. September saw the S&P 500 tumble to its worst month since the coronavirus pandemic crashed global markets. It enters October at its lowest level since November 2020 and is down by more than a quarter since the start of the year. Oil prices rose more than $3 a barrel.

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Police in Nebraska say a passenger’s cellphone automatically alerted responders after a car hit a tree in a crash that killed all six of its young occupants. Five men in the car died at the scene of the crash in Lincoln in the wee hours of Sunday. A woman died later at a hospital. The victims ranged in age from 21 to 24. Police are still investigating the cause of the crash. But they say it was reported by an iPhone that detected the impact and called responders automatically when the phone’s owner didn’t respond.

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A spokesman for Poland’s communist-era government in the 1980s who masterminded state propaganda and censorship for a regime in the final years before its collapse has died. He was 89 years old. Jerzy Urban's death was announced on Monday by a satirical weekly magazine which he founded and led in the post-1989 era. Urban earned a reputation for his sarcasm and acid tongue in the early 1980s when he served as the spokesman for the government of Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski. Jaruzelski’s government imposed martial law in an attempt to crush the Solidarity freedom movement of Lech Walesa. Urban became a successful and wealthy businessman after the fall of communism.

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Clergy sexual abuse cases are casting a pall over the Catholic Church in Portugal. They are ensnaring senior Portuguese officials even as authorities scramble to explain why shelter was given to a Nobel Peace Prize-winning bishop at the center of sexual misconduct allegations. A spotlight fell on Portuguese church authorities last week when the Holy See’s sex abuse office confirmed that it had secretly sanctioned Bishop Carlos Ximenes Belo. Belo is living in an undisclosed location in Portugal. Portugal’s attorney general’s office confirmed to The Associated Press on Monday that the head of the Portuguese Bishops Conference is being investigated on suspicion he covered up for abuser priests in Mozambique in a separate case.

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Kim Kardashian has agreed to pay $1.26 million to settle Securities and Exchange Commission charges that she promoted a cryptocurrency on Instagram without disclosing she’d been paid $250,000 to do so. The SEC said Monday that the reality TV star and entrepreneur has agreed to cooperate with its ongoing investigation. The SEC said Kardashian failed to disclose that she was paid to publish a post on her Instagram account about EMAX tokens, a crypto asset security being offered by EthereumMax.

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The new president of the Southern Baptist Convention is a staunchly conservative small-town preacher who touts biblical inerrancy, opposes women serving as pastors and supports abortion bans. Bart Barber also says he wants to be a unifier, a healer and a reformer as the United States' largest Protestant denomination reels from a major sex abuse crisis in which SBC leaders were found to have stonewalled victims for decades. Barber, 52, is a highly educated historian and expert on SBC polity. But he seems most at home on his Texas pastureland, communing with cows that he gives SBC-inspired names like Bully Graham, after the late Rev. Billy Graham.

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Sweden's navy says it has sent a vessel capable of “advanced diving missions” to the Baltic Sea area where ruptured undersea pipelines leaked natural gas for days. The Swedish navy said Monday the vessel is a submarine rescue ship. One of the gas leaks off Sweden has increased again, the Swedish coast guard said. Undersea blasts last week damaged the pipelines off southern Sweden and Denmark and have led to huge methane leaks. Denmark and Sweden say that several hundred pounds of explosives was involved. The leaks occurred in international waters. On Monday, the Swedish coast guard said one of the gas leaks off Sweden has increased again.

It was as much art fair as fashion show for Stella McCartney who put on an art-infused spring collection at Paris Fashion Week on Monday that vibrated with flashes of color. Iconic Japanese contemporary artist Yoshitomo Nara collaborated on the designs showcased at Paris’ Pompidou Center Modern Art Museum, while art megastar Jeff Koons casually popped in to say ‘hello’ to McCartney post-show, peering at her comically across an atelier of world-famous sculptures by Constantin Brancusi. The display also pioneered the use of regenerative cotton.

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Tobacco growers in southeast Turkey's Celikhan district are feeling the pinch as annual inflation reaches a new 24-year high. Official data released Monday shows consumer prices rose 83.45% from a year earlier, further hitting households already facing high energy, food and housing costs. Experts say the real rate of inflation is much higher, at an eye-watering 186%. While countries worldwide are hit by soaring prices, economists believe Turkey's woes are self-inflicted as the central bank cuts interest rates. In Celikhan, 19-year-old Mehmet Emin Cakan works two shifts harvesting and then stringing the tobacco to help support his family and pay for books to study. Tobacco growers say rising costs from fuel and fertilizers have seriously affected their livelihood.

Medical bills can quickly become overwhelming, but consumers often have more power than they might think when it comes to navigating them. Recent changes to how medical debt is reported by credit bureaus also help. The first step is always to closely check bills for errors and to ask your provider if you are eligible for any financial assistance programs, which many hospitals offer. If you need additional help, billing advocates and the employee benefits contact at your workplace can also assist. Finally, try to prepare for future bills by building up emergency savings and shopping around for in-network providers.

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Vladimir Putin’s military draft “changed everything” for the tens of thousands of Russians who have fled their country since the Russian leader’s mobilization was announced last month. That's according to recent arrivals in Istanbul. One 28-year-old left St. Petersburg last week, part of a torrent of Russian men escaping their homeland following Putin’s Sept. 21 declaration of a “partial mobilization” for the war in Ukraine. He said he feared being drafted. The situation in the past two weeks is not unlike the aftermath of Russia’s 1917 revolution, when hundreds of thousands of “white Russians” found refuge in Istanbul while fleeing the Bolsheviks.

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Theaters and other cultural institutions in Hungary are reeling from exponentially growing energy prices, and some plan to close for the winter to avoid the skyrocketing bills. The Erkel Theatre in the capital of Budapest will close in November after its utilities went up as much as tenfold, and local governments across the country have ordered theaters, cinemas and museums to shut down during the cold months. Others are cutting costs by staging fewer productions, having fewer rehearsals and turning down the thermostat. As winter approaches, cultural leaders say the energy crisis could have negative consequences for the cultural life of Hungarians.

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Days after Hurricane Ian carved a path of destruction from Florida to the Carolinas, the dangers persisted, and even worsened in some places. It was clear the road to recovery from the monster storm will be long and painful. Search and rescue efforts are ongoing Monday. And Ian still is not done. The storm doused Virginia with rain Sunday. It was dissipating as it moved offshore, but officials warned there still was the potential of severe flooding along Virginia's coast and a coastal flood warning was in effect Monday. Ian was one of the strongest storms to make landfall in the United States.

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British Defense Secretary Ben Wallace says the Joint Expeditionary Force alliance of nations will meet Monday to discuss the safety of undersea pipelines and cables after blasts ruptured two natural gas pipelines in the Baltic Sea. Wallace said the virtual meeting has been called by the U.K. and the Netherlands. The force brings together troops from 10 northern European countries, including the Baltic and Nordic nations, and has seen its importance increase since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February. Undersea blasts that damaged the Nord Stream 1 and 2 pipelines last week have led to huge methane leaks. Nordic investigators said the blasts have involved several hundred pounds of explosives.

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Johnny Gaudreau leaving Calgary for Columbus headlined a busy offseason of player movement around the NHL. Goaltender Darcy Kuemper left Colorado for Washington after backstopping the Avalanche to the Stanley Cup. The champs also lost center Nazem Kadri to free agency when he signed with the Flames. Florida got Matthew Tkachuk from the Flames in the biggest trade of the summer that sent Jonathan Huberdeau and Mackenzie Weegar to Calgary. And Ottawa made some noise by acquiring goalie Cam Talbot and winger Alex DeBrincat and signing longtime Philadelphia captain Claude Giroux.

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The British government has dropped plans to cut income tax for top earners. The move was part of a package of unfunded cuts that sparked turmoil on financial markets and sent the pound to record lows. Treasury chief Kwasi Kwarteng said Monday that he would abandon plans to scrap the top 45% rate of income tax paid on earnings above 150,000 pounds a year. The announcement comes as more lawmakers from the governing Conservative Party turn on government tax plans. The announcement of 45 billion pounds in tax cuts sent the pound tumbling to a record low against the dollar. The Bank of England had to step in to stabilize the bond markets.

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