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The University of Nebraska-Lincoln Crop Performance Testing program will sponsor wheat variety trial field tours in seven locations across Neb…

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While the national trend points to a decline in the number and size of families with children, there is significant regional variation. Find out which states have the biggest families. 

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The data on the millennial share of the total population, the share of millennials that are single, the percentage of single millennials employed full-time, the median income for full-time millennials, and the singles gender balance for millennials is from the 2017 American Community Survey Public Use Microdata Sample (ACS PUMS) dataset.

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Data on the proportion of adults who currently use e-cigarettes comes from the Centers for Disease and Control Prevention SMART Survey (Selected Metropolitan Area Risk Trends) conducted in 2017 and it is based on more than 400,000 interviews nationally. The growth in e-cigarette use was calculated as the percentage change between 2017 and 2016, which also came from the SMART survey. The SMART survey also contains information on the rates of depression by metropolitan area.

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To identify the cities with the hardest-working parents, a composite score was calculated for each metro based on the following factors (all weighted equally), with higher scores indicating that parents work harder:

Dear Annie: I work in a big city. After work, I enjoy going to the local bar. I've been doing this for three years, and everything was fine — …

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The median household income for single parent households in the U.S. is $37,100. Across major metros, this number ranges from a high of $78,000 to a low of $22,000. Nationally, the unemployment rate among single parents is 5.9 percent and ranges from less than 1 percent to as high as 19 percent.The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) considers families who pay more than 30 percent of their income on housing to be “cost burdened.” On the whole, housing accounts for 23 percent of household income among single parents in the U.S. That fluctuates dramatically across major metro areas, from 16 percent to 38 percent.Research shows that parents’ educational level has strong positive effects on the educational and occupational success of children. In cities where many single parents have a college education, we’re interpreting that as a sign that they’re “doing well,” even though that’s a subjective measure. Across the U.S., one-third of all single parents hold a bachelor’s degree or higher. Some major metro areas fall far beneath that average. In parts of Texas and central California, less than 20 percent of single parents have a bachelor’s degree. On the other hand, in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area, that number is 57 percent.Less time commuting means more time with the kids. The average American worker spends 26 minutes commuting each way (53 minutes per day). At 19 minutes each way, Wichita, Kansas, is the only major metro area in which workers have a commute that’s under 20 minutes.

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The data used in this analysis is from the U.S. Census Bureau 2017 American Community Survey PUMS. For the purpose of this analysis, millennials are defined as respondents between the ages of 21 and 36 in 2017.

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With just a few exceptions, the most expensive neighborhood in every state is typically found within or in close proximity to one of the largest cities in that state.While some of the most expensive neighborhoods in every state are located in the heart of their respective cities—for example, SoHo in New York or Filter Square in Philadelphia—the majority are residential communities outside of their urban city centers.Stark differences in price exist among nearby neighborhoods as a result of schools, views, proximity to commercial/recreational interests, taxes, safety, and a host of other factors. In San Francisco, there is more than a 6x difference in price between the most expensive and least expensive neighborhood. In Seattle, that number is 4x and in Los Angeles, it’s almost 9x.Price differences among the states is striking. There are more than 1,000 neighborhoods in California that are more expensive than the most expensive neighborhoods in the bottom 20 percent of states.

Dear Annie: I recently moved to a noisy downtown apartment building. I'm a pretty deep sleeper, but the noise level at my new place is challen…

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