Skip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
AP

Parts of Europe Return to Lockdown: What Travelers Must Know

COVID-19 restrictions have returned to Europe. Here's how to plan for navigating restrictions or creating a backup plan.

If you’re planning to spend the holidays at a German Christmas market or on a beach in Greece, be aware that COVID-19-related safety measures are returning across Europe. This time, they’re largely in the form of restrictions for those who are unvaccinated in response to rising case rates.

Some regions of Germany have already imposed local restrictions that prevent unvaccinated adults from some public spaces. Other proposals would allow only people who are vaccinated, have recovered or who have proof of a negative COVID-19 test to ride public transit.

As well, only vaccinated and people who have recovered from COVID have access to museums, restaurants and events in Baden-Württemberg, while unvaccinated people will no longer be allowed in bars and clubs in Hamburg. Health authorities in Germany reported at the beginning of the week that the seven-day incidence rate of new COVID-19 infections has hit a new high.

"The fourth wave is hitting our country with full force," German Chancellor Angela Merkel said this week.

Meanwhile, in Greece, unvaccinated people will be prevented from entering most indoor spaces including restaurants, theaters, museums and gyms, Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said in a televised address this week.

Also, Austria announced measures to prevent unvaccinated people ages 12 and older from entering many public spaces including hotels, restaurants, gyms, theaters, hair salons and more, while also requiring face masks in most public spaces.

Those are far from the only European countries with COVID-19 lockdown restrictions, and many other nations have recently added — or are considering adding — new rules.

What to do if you’re traveling to Europe

Whether you’re vaccinated or not, you might want to reschedule a European trip given the rising case rates. Or, perhaps you’re forging on with visit. Either way, here’s what you need to know:

Know how to cancel your trip

One positive outcome of the pandemic: Most change and cancellation policies have improved. Check yours, as most travel companies provide either full refunds or account credits, even if past refund policies were strict.

At booking time, consider purchasing a travel insurance policy with Cancel For Any Reason coverage if you have nonrefundable costs. This type of insurance will typically net you 50% to 75% of any nonrefundable travel expenses back, no matter the reason you cancel.

Pack proof of vaccination

While it certainly doesn’t hurt to bring the physical card, it’s also smart to pack a digital version through an app such as CLEAR's Health Pass, which can prevent the original from getting lost or damaged as you take it in and out of your wallet.

Just be aware that not every country or establishment will accept digital versions, so check your destinations before relying on digital proof. A country may have specific requirements to prove your vaccination status, be it an app, digital upload or physical copy. If you’re unwilling to download an app, you could also snap a photo and save it to your smartphone to keep proof of vaccination on hand.

Make a backup plan

A museum you intended to visit might suddenly close, curfews could kick in or you might need to don a mask as you roam around Europe. Now more than ever, your trip is likely to not go as planned given Europe’s ever-changing COVID-19 rules. But you can have some control by having a backup plan.

Pack extra medications or essential items that can’t easily be acquired abroad should you suddenly need to quarantine. Know nearby airports you can fly out of should your planned flight get canceled. And for a trip to Europe — or anywhere else these days — pack your patience.

The bottom line

Multiple European countries have added fresh sets of COVID-19 restrictions this week, and it’s likely that more will follow. If you’ve got a trip to Europe planned, understand that the rules might be different than in the U.S. — and they could change at the last minute, too.

While the recent bout of restrictions will likely affect unvaccinated travelers only, understand that the pandemic’s impact on every country is different, and you should be prepared for it.

You must be logged in to react.
Click any reaction to login.
0
0
0
0
0

Need to get away?

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

As the pandemic subsides, new trends have been revealed. There has been much speculation about how travel would emerge but now there is data from travel technology company Amadeus to confirm the suspicions. “As the travel sector recovers, we are seeing some truly exciting trends emerge that will shape the industry," said Dan Batchelor, vice president, global corporate communications and social ...

Of Americans who plan to put 2021 holiday travel expenses on a credit card, the average they plan to charge is $1,471, a September 2021 NerdWallet survey found. That’s a lot…

Ah, the good old days—of June when the world was our oyster.  Freshly vaxxed and passport in hand, we planned long-awaited trips to newly opened destinations. Then we started learning the letters of the Greek Alphabet: first Delta, now Omicron.  Now every plan we have made, as well as any going forward, has a question […]

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alert

Breaking News